Lock ‘Em Up! The Futility of Incarceration; Too Many People Over Sentenced; Need to Go To The Cause of Crime; Consider a National Policy on Imprisonment; Half of Sentences Are for Drugs;

INCARCERATION OF PRISONERS

SITUATION
U.S, has more people in jail than any other country
Recovery for crime & prison combo is difficult
Need to point to successes in rehab & new life for prisoners
Drug related sentences are most difficult to get rid of.

SOLUTIONS
Stop imprisoning people for drug use;
What happens in prison determines integration into society;
Determine who can be rehabbed and who should be confined.
Use of imprisonment to give prisoners options- Change being one

Where do we need to go from here?
In particular, start by:
 Eliminating mandatory minimum sentences and cutting back on excessively lengthy sentences;
 Shifting resources to community-based prevention and treatment for substance abuse.
 Investing in interventions to that promote strong youth development and respond to delinquency.
 Examining and addressing the policies and practices, conscious or not, that contribute to racial inequity at every stage of the justice system.
 Removing barriers that make it harder for individuals with criminal records to turn their lives around.

What Needed to happen?
 Use failures provided as roadmap for policy priorities & legal reform
 Ongoing need to decarcerate and end the era of mass incarceration
 Includes rolling back extreme sentences
 Ensuring that decarceration efforts center racial justice as a goal
 Promoting voting rights for all regardless of conviction history.

Some say -That prisons and jails are largely incompetent, inhumane,

SEZ:
Executive Director Amy Fettig penned an essay in the University of Miami Law Review
Argues that federal, state and local government response to the COVID-19 epidemic is wrong;
That prisons and jails was largely incompetent, inhumane,
And contrary to sound public health policy, resulting in preventable death and suffering for both incarcerated people and corrections staff.

STATS:
Since 1980 Americans incarcerated for drug offenses skyrocketed from 40,900 to 430,926 in 2019.

SOURCES
The Sentencing Project -https://www.sentencingproject.org/issues/incarceration/
Can Covid 19 Teach use How to End Mass Incarceration?

 

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